The Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance (NARA) is a consortium of university, government, and private industry researchers tasked with demonstrating the conversion of logging residues to biojet fuel in an economic, social, and environmentally acceptable manner. 

NARA is led by Washington State University and supported by the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Supply chain logistics are a key aspect in biorefinery viability and thus knowledge of the spatial allocation of logging residues as well as how that allocation may change over time is fundamental. To accomplish this the NARA Biomass Modeling and Assessment group developed and enhanced existing models of forest markets to generate a set of logging residue supply curves for a set of potential biorefinery sites across the OR, WA, ID, and MT region.

This report describes the two spatially explicit economic models used for different components of the NARA project.

  • Task 1: Develop Preliminary Biomass Supply Model And Supply Curves
  • Task 2: Second Iteration Regional Biomass Supply Curves

CONVERSION INTO BIOJET FUEL

There are a number of ways to convert forest slash into biojet fuel; however, integrating the multiple technologies into a production system is a technical challenge.

NARA has demonstrated a conversion pathway that is effective, economical, of scale, and adaptable to existing facilities in the Pacific Northwest. NARA work has resulted in:

  • an adaptable and scalable sulfite-based pretreatment and fermentation system that converts forest residuals into isobutanol.
  • an economic blueprint to project the costs and potential revenues associated with a biorefinery that converts forest residuals into biojet fuel and co-products.
  • alternative pretreatment technologies such as wet oxidation and wood milling.

See the process that NWABF uses for the conversion of woody biomass into sustainable aviation fuel.